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Echo intensity of the rectus femoris in stable COPD patients

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, October 2017
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  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
39 Mendeley
Title
Echo intensity of the rectus femoris in stable COPD patients
Published in
International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, October 2017
DOI 10.2147/copd.s143645
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xiong Ye, Mingjie Wang, Hui Xiao

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate whether echo intensity of the rectus femoris when measured using ultrasound can distinguish muscles affected by COPD compared with healthy non-COPD affected muscles and whether the severity of ultrasonic abnormalities was associated with health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Echo intensity, areas of the rectus femoris, and the thickness of quadriceps muscles were measured using ultrasound in 50 COPD outpatients and 21 age-matched non-COPD controls. The results of the 8-Item Short-Form Health Survey and the functional assessment of chronic illness therapy fatigue scales were used to evaluate HRQoL. There was a significantly higher echo intensity of the rectus femoris in all stages of COPD patients than in age-matched non-COPD subjects; the quadriceps muscle thickness and cross-sectional area of the rectus femoris significantly decreased in COPD GOLD III-IV only. Furthermore, in our stable COPD patients, echo intensity of the rectus femoris was associated with HRQoL independently. Quantitative ultrasound distinguishes healthy muscles from those affected by COPD grade I-IV, and quality and quantity of muscles are associated with HRQoL and forced expiratory volume in 1 second. Ultrasonic echo intensity of the rectus femoris may be a useful instrument for assessing disease severity and monitoring the changes of skeletal muscle resulting from disease progression or clinical intervention in patients with COPD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 15%
Student > Postgraduate 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Researcher 3 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 8%
Other 8 21%
Unknown 12 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 15%
Sports and Recreations 2 5%
Psychology 1 3%
Neuroscience 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 17 44%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 June 2018.
All research outputs
#8,237,019
of 13,138,880 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#1,033
of 1,594 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#157,953
of 275,746 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#34
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,138,880 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,594 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,746 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.