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The role of pain in pulmonary rehabilitation: a qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
73 Mendeley
Title
The role of pain in pulmonary rehabilitation: a qualitative study
Published in
International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, November 2017
DOI 10.2147/copd.s145442
Pubmed ID
Authors

Samantha Harrison, Annemarie Lee, Helene Button, Rebecca Shea, Roger Goldstein, Dina Brooks, Cormac Ryan, Denis Martin

Abstract

One third of individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) report pain. To help inform a COPD-specific pain intervention, we explored the views of health care providers (HCPs) and individuals with COPD on pain during pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). This is a qualitative study using inductive thematic analysis. Eighteen HCPs familiar with PR and 19 patients enrolled in PR participated in semi-structured interviews. Demographic data were recorded, and the patients completed the Brief Pain Inventory (Short Form). 1) Interaction between pain and COPD: pain is a common experience in COPD, heightened by breathlessness and anxiety. 2) Pain interfering with PR: a) Communicating pain: HCPs rarely ask about pain and patients are reluctant to report it for fear of being removed from PR. b) PR is a short-term aggravator but long-term reliever: although pain limits exercise, concentration, and program adherence, PR may reduce pain by increasing muscle strength and improving coping. c) Advice and strategies for pain: some attention is given to pain management but this is often counterproductive, encouraging patients to cease exercise. 3) An intervention to manage pain: HCPs were enthusiastic about delivering a pain intervention within their knowledge and time constraints. Early group education was preferred. A pain intervention seems warranted in PR and may improve adherence and therefore clinical benefit. A pain intervention could be provided as part of PR education with HCP training.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 73 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 16%
Student > Master 11 15%
Researcher 8 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 10%
Other 4 5%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 21 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 16 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 19%
Psychology 6 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 3%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 27 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 April 2021.
All research outputs
#4,991,232
of 19,003,560 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#563
of 2,089 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,798
of 333,718 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#14
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,003,560 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,089 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 333,718 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.