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Systematic review of the association between Alzheimer’s disease and chronic glaucoma

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Ophthalmology, October 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
31 Mendeley
Title
Systematic review of the association between Alzheimer’s disease and chronic glaucoma
Published in
Clinical Ophthalmology, October 2014
DOI 10.2147/opth.s69534
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexandros Tsilis, George Kitsos, Sygkliti-Henriette Pelidou, Konstantinos Tsilidis

Abstract

A potential association between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and chronic glaucoma has been suggested but results of epidemiological studies have been inconsistent. Therefore, we performed a systematic review and critical appraisal of this literature. We searched systematically in PubMed from December 1964 to September 2013 and identified 239 articles potentially relevant for abstract and full-text review. Statistical heterogeneity (variability) across studies was evaluated using the Cochran Q test and the I (2) statistic, and the Newcastle-Ottawa score was used to assess study quality. Ten studies were finally selected. Compared to non-demented participants, patients with AD had a statistically significant decreased risk of glaucoma but the results were very heterogeneous, and thus summary estimates were not reported (I (2), 89%; P heterogeneity, <0.001). The study results ranged from large positive relative risks identified in small and poorly-conducted studies to weak inverse associations or null estimates observed in some cohort and record-linkage studies, but the summary estimates were essentially driven by a large retrospective cohort using medical claims that may be afflicted by underdiagnosis bias. There was also evidence for substantial publication bias (Egger's P≤0.01). The association of AD and glaucoma is heterogeneous and most studies are small and inadequately designed. Large prospective studies with long follow-ups are warranted to clarify this association.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 19%
Professor 3 10%
Other 2 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 10 32%
Unknown 2 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 19%
Neuroscience 3 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Psychology 2 6%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 5 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 November 2014.
All research outputs
#7,453,930
of 12,488,808 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Ophthalmology
#639
of 1,597 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#130,369
of 283,396 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Ophthalmology
#14
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,488,808 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,597 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,396 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.