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Cluster headache as a first manifestation of multiple sclerosis: case report and literature review

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
32 Mendeley
Title
Cluster headache as a first manifestation of multiple sclerosis: case report and literature review
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, November 2014
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s73491
Pubmed ID
Authors

Milija Mijajlovic, Vuk Aleksic, Nadezda Covickovic-Sternic

Abstract

Cluster headache (CH) is estimated to be the most common primary trigeminal autonomic headache, although it is a rare disabling medical condition. Dominant symptoms of CH include severe unilateral orbital, supraorbital, and/or temporal pain, lasting from 15 to 180 minutes if untreated, associated with at least one of various autonomic symptoms during the headache, such as conjunctival injection, lacrimation, nasal congestion and rhinorrhea, facial sweating, miosis, ptosis, and eyelid edema. Headache is not frequently a symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS). The most commonly reported primary headaches are migraine without aura and a tension-type headache. Several described cases involved complicated migraine, ophthalmoplegic migraine-like headache, and finally cluster-like headache. We present a case of a 45-year-old male patient who had typical CH attacks as the initial and only clinical manifestation of MS, which was diagnosed after cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) isoelectric focusing and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) investigation. He presented as a typical cluster-like headache patient since in the background of the CH symptoms and signs, were MS demyelinating lesions. In a patient with CH symptoms one should always think about the possibility of cluster-like-headache, which presents the CH patient with different underlying diseases, so we proposed a protocol to evaluate such patients and exclude diseases that could be in the background of CH symptoms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 16%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Postgraduate 3 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Other 6 19%
Unknown 6 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 34%
Neuroscience 6 19%
Engineering 2 6%
Psychology 2 6%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 9 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 June 2016.
All research outputs
#6,398,343
of 12,517,383 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#705
of 2,120 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#94,685
of 286,154 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#25
of 73 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,517,383 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,120 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,154 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 73 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.