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Reversible preoperative renal dysfunction does not add to the risk of postoperative acute kidney injury after cardiac valve surgery

Overview of attention for article published in Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
4 Mendeley
Title
Reversible preoperative renal dysfunction does not add to the risk of postoperative acute kidney injury after cardiac valve surgery
Published in
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, November 2017
DOI 10.2147/tcrm.s148549
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jia-Rui Xu, Ya-Min Zhuang, Lan Liu, Bo Shen, Yi-Mei Wang, Zhe Luo, Jie Teng, Chun-Sheng Wang, Xiao-Qiang Ding

Abstract

To evaluate the impact of the renal dysfunction (RD) type and change of postoperative cardiac function on the risk of developing acute kidney injury (AKI) in patients who underwent cardiac valve surgery. Reversible renal dysfunction (RRD) was defined as preoperative RD in patients who had not been initially diagnosed with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Cardiac function improvement (CFI) was defined as postoperative left ventricular ejection function - preoperative left ventricular ejection function (ΔEF) >0%, and cardiac function not improved (CFNI) as ΔEF ≤0%. Of the 4,805 (94%) cardiac valve surgery patients, 301 (6%) were RD cases. The AKI incidence in the RRD group (n=252) was significantly lower than in the CKD group (n=49) (36.5% vs 63.3%, P=0.018). The AKI and renal replacement therapy incidences in the CFI group (n=174) were significantly lower than in the CFNI group (n=127) (33.9% vs 50.4%, P=0.004; 6.3% vs 13.4%, P=0.037). After adjustment for age, gender, and other confounding factors, CKD and CKD + CFNI were identified as independent risk factors for AKI in all patients after cardiac valve surgery. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the risk factors for postoperative AKI in preoperative RD patients were age, gender (male), hypertension, diabetes, chronic heart failure, cardiopulmonary bypass time (every 1 min added), and intraoperative hypotension, while CFI after surgery could reduce the risk. For cardiac valve surgery patients, preoperative CKD was an independent risk factor for postoperative AKI, but RRD did not add to the risk. Improved postoperative cardiac function can significantly reduce the risk of postoperative AKI.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 4 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 4 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unknown 4 100%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unknown 4 100%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 December 2017.
All research outputs
#7,046,733
of 12,485,238 outputs
Outputs from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#436
of 922 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#171,755
of 378,494 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#9
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,485,238 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 922 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 378,494 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.