↓ Skip to main content

Dove Medical Press

Article Metrics

Ultrasound-mediated cavitation does not decrease the activity of small molecule, antibody or viral-based medicines

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Nanomedicine, January 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
25 Mendeley
Title
Ultrasound-mediated cavitation does not decrease the activity of small molecule, antibody or viral-based medicines
Published in
International Journal of Nanomedicine, January 2018
DOI 10.2147/ijn.s141557
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rachel Myers, Megan Grundy, Cliff Rowe, Christian Coviello, Luca Bau, Philippe Erbs, Johann Foloppe, Jean-Marc Balloul, Colin Story, Constantin Coussios, Robert Carlisle

Abstract

The treatment of cancer using nanomedicines is limited by the poor penetration of these potentially powerful agents into and throughout solid tumors. Externally controlled mechanical stimuli, such as the generation of cavitation-induced microstreaming using ultrasound (US), can provide a means of improving nanomedicine delivery. Notably, it has been demonstrated that by focusing, monitoring and controlling the US exposure, delivery can be achieved without damage to surrounding tissue or vasculature. However, there is a risk that such stimuli may disrupt the structure and thereby diminish the activity of the delivered drugs, especially complex antibody and viral-based nanomedicines. In this study, we characterize the impact of cavitation on four different agents, doxorubicin (Dox), cetuximab, adenovirus (Ad) and vaccinia virus (VV), representing a scale of sophistication from a simple small-molecule drug to complex biological agents. To achieve tight regulation of the level and duration of cavitation exposure, a "cavitation test rig" was designed and built. The activity of each agent was assessed with and without exposure to a defined cavitation regime which has previously been shown to provide effective and safe delivery of agents to tumors in preclinical studies. The fluorescence profile of Dox remained unchanged after exposure to cavitation, and the efficacy of this drug in killing a cancer cell line remained the same. Similarly, the ability of cetuximab to bind its epidermal growth factor receptor target was not diminished following exposure to cavitation. The encoding of the reporter gene luciferase within the Ad and VV constructs tested here allowed the infectivity of these viruses to be easily quantified. Exposure to cavitation did not impact on the activity of either virus. These data provide compelling evidence that the US parameters used to safely and successfully delivery nanomedicines to tumors in preclinical models do not detrimentally impact on the structure or activity of these nanomedicines.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 44%
Student > Bachelor 3 12%
Researcher 2 8%
Lecturer 1 4%
Student > Master 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 6 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 6 24%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Other 4 16%
Unknown 6 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 February 2018.
All research outputs
#6,585,127
of 12,504,607 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Nanomedicine
#656
of 2,466 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#135,915
of 341,162 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Nanomedicine
#16
of 102 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,504,607 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,466 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 341,162 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 102 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.