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Self-stigma and treatment effectiveness in patients with anxiety disorders – a mediation analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
47 Mendeley
Title
Self-stigma and treatment effectiveness in patients with anxiety disorders – a mediation analysis
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, January 2018
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s152208
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marie Ociskova, Jan Prasko, Kristyna Vrbova, Petra Kasalova, Michaela Holubova, Ales Grambal, Klara Machu

Abstract

The goal of this study was to explore the impact of self-stigma on the treatment outcomes in patients with anxiety disorders and to find possible mediators of this relationship. Two hundred and nine patients with anxiety disorders, who were hospitalized in a psychotherapeutic department, attended the study. The average age was 39.2±12.4 years; two-thirds were women. Most of the patients used a long-term medication. The participants underwent either cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or short psychodynamic therapy. The selection to the psychotherapy was not randomized. All individuals completed several scales - Beck Depression Inventory, the second edition (BDI-II), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Dissociative Experience Scale (DES), Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), subjective Clinical Global Impression (subjCGI), and The Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale (ISMI). A senior psychiatrist filled out the objective CGI (objCGI). The patients significantly improved in the severity of anxiety (BAI), depression (BDI-II), and overall severity of the mental disorder (objCGI). The self-stigma predicted a lower change of the objCGI, but not a change of the anxiety and depressive symptoms severity. Anxiety, depressive symptoms, dissociation, and disability were assessed as possible mediators of the relationship between the self-stigma and the treatment change. None of them were significant. Self-stigma lowers the effectiveness of the combined treatment of anxiety disorders. Future research should explore other possible mediators influencing this relationship.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 23%
Researcher 7 15%
Student > Postgraduate 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Professor 3 6%
Other 10 21%
Unknown 8 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 14 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 17%
Social Sciences 5 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 9 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 January 2018.
All research outputs
#7,844,907
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,032
of 2,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#155,737
of 360,107 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#35
of 80 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,537,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,487 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 360,107 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 80 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.