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NaCl: for the safer in vivo use of antibacterial silver based nanoparticles

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Nanomedicine, March 2018
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18 Mendeley
Title
NaCl: for the safer in vivo use of antibacterial silver based nanoparticles
Published in
International Journal of Nanomedicine, March 2018
DOI 10.2147/ijn.s153168
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mingzhuo Liu, Huiqing Zhang, Xiangwei Song, Chaochao Wei, Zhenfang Xiong, Fen Yu, Chen Li, Fanrong Ai, Guanghua Guo, Xiaolei Wang

Abstract

As antibiotics progressively cease to be effective, silver based nanoparticles (SBNs), with broad antibacterial spectrum, might be the last line of defense against malicious bacteria. Unfortunately, there are still no proper SBNs-based strategies for in vivo antibacterial therapies. In this article, new carbon membrane packaged Ag nanoparticles (Ag-C) were synthesized. We assessed the effect of Ag-C with NaCl on size, cytotoxicity, antibacterial properties, metabolism and sepsis models. The size of Ag-C with NaCl was accessed with UV-vis, TEM and SEM. Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used to illustrate the antibacterial properties of SBNs affected by NaCl. L929 and 3T3 cell lines were cultured in vitro; CCK-8 assay was used to test cytotoxicity. Then, we explored the metabolism of Ag-C with NaCl in vivo. Finally, the effect of Ag-C with 4× NaCl on sepsis was observed. NaCl could regulate the size of Ag-C. Ag-C exhibited superior antibacterial properties compared to similar sized pure Ag nanoparticles. Furthermore, the addition of NaCl could not only reduce the cytotoxicity of Ag-C, but could also continue to discharge Ag-C from major organs. Based on these factors, this method was used to treat a sepsis model (induced via cecal ligation and puncture), and it achieved satisfactory survival results. This discovery, though still in its infancy, could significantly improve the safety and feasibility of SBNs and could potentially play an important role in modern in vivo antibacterial applications. Thus, a new method to combating the growing threat from drug-resistant bacteria could be possible. NaCl is the key to excretion of SBNs after in vivo antibacterial use.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 11%
Other 2 11%
Student > Bachelor 2 11%
Student > Master 2 11%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 6%
Other 3 17%
Unknown 6 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 6%
Computer Science 1 6%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 6 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 April 2018.
All research outputs
#14,676,177
of 16,639,069 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Nanomedicine
#2,602
of 3,044 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#246,658
of 284,625 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Nanomedicine
#44
of 46 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,639,069 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,044 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,625 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 46 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.