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Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1: a proinflammatory cytokine elevated in sarcopenic obesity

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, March 2015
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1 tweeter

Citations

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66 Mendeley
Title
Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1: a proinflammatory cytokine elevated in sarcopenic obesity
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, March 2015
DOI 10.2147/cia.s78901
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mei Sian Chong, Jun Pei Lim, Bernard Leung, Yew Yoong Ding, Laura Tay, Noor Hafizah Ismail, Audrey Yeo, Suzanne Yew

Abstract

Sarcopenic obesity (SO) is associated with poorer physical outcomes and functional status in the older adult. A proinflammatory milieu associated with central obesity is postulated to enhance muscle catabolism. We set out to examine associations of the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in groups of older adults, with sarcopenia, obesity, and the SO phenotypes. A total of 143 community dwelling, well, older adults were recruited. Cross-sectional clinical data, physical performance, and muscle mass measurements were collected. Obesity and sarcopenia were defined using revised National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) obesity guidelines and those of the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia. Serum levels of MCP-1 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In all, 25.2% of subjects were normal, 15.4% sarcopenic, 48.3% obese, and 11.2% were SO. The SO groups had the lowest appendicular lean mass, highest percentage body fat, and lowest performance scores on the Short Physical Performance Battery and grip strength. The MCP-1 levels were significantly different, with the highest levels found in SO participants (P<0.05). Significantly raised MCP-1 levels in obese and SO subjects support the theory of chronic inflammation due to excess adiposity. Longitudinal studies will reveal whether SO represents a continuum of obesity causing accelerated sarcopenia and cardiovascular events, or the coexistence of two separate conditions with synergistic effects affecting functional performance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 2%
Italy 1 2%
Unknown 64 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 15%
Student > Bachelor 9 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 9%
Researcher 6 9%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 15 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 8%
Sports and Recreations 5 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 10 15%
Unknown 20 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 April 2015.
All research outputs
#4,162,155
of 4,977,898 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#642
of 707 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#125,905
of 150,243 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#14
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,977,898 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 707 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 150,243 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.