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Dove Medical Press

Dietary patterns and schizophrenia: a comparison with healthy controls

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (74th percentile)

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17 X users
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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18 Dimensions

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37 Mendeley
Title
Dietary patterns and schizophrenia: a comparison with healthy controls
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, April 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s74760
Pubmed ID
Authors

Koji Tsuruga, Norio Sugawara, Yasushi Sato, Manabu Saito, Hanako Furukori, Taku Nakagami, Kazuhiko Nakamura, Ippei Takahashi, Shigeyuki Nakaji, Norio Yasui-Furukori

Abstract

It has been reported that the onset of schizophrenia and the physical complications after its onset are related to diet. Diet has been considered as a variable factor of the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. However, the results of studies on this relationship have been inconsistent. Nutrients are consumed as a mixture in the diet. It is difficult to study them in isolation because they may have mutually complementary effects. The aim of this study was to assess the association between dietary patterns and schizophrenia in Japan. The subjects comprised 237 outpatients aged 30-60 years (123 males and 114 females) with diagnoses of either schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. The patient diagnoses were determined based on medical records. Patients were recruited between June 2011 and August 2011. As a reference group, 404 healthy volunteers aged 30-60 years (158 males and 246 females) were also included. Demographic data (age, sex, and level of education) were collected by face-to-face method interviews and self-administered questionnaires. We assessed eating habits over the last month using a validated brief self-administered diet history questionnaire. We detected dietary patterns through a principal component analysis of calorie-adjusted intake; two principal components were retained. The principal components for each dietary pattern and for each individual were divided into tertiles by principal component scores. We derived two dietary patterns by principal component analysis; namely, the "vegetable" dietary pattern and the "cereal" dietary pattern. In the "cereal" dietary pattern, the high tertile was associated with a significantly increased risk of schizophrenia (P<0.001). The "cereal" dietary pattern is associated with schizophrenia. This article is the first to describe a study examining the association of dietary pattern and schizophrenia.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 16%
Researcher 5 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Lecturer 2 5%
Student > Bachelor 2 5%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 14 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 19%
Psychology 5 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 19 51%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 May 2020.
All research outputs
#3,495,868
of 25,818,700 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#523
of 3,151 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,368
of 280,080 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#20
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,818,700 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,151 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,080 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.