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All-cause mortality from obstructive sleep apnea in male and female patients with and without continuous positive airway pressure treatment: a registry study with 10 years of follow-up

Overview of attention for article published in Nature and science of sleep, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
38 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
51 Mendeley
Title
All-cause mortality from obstructive sleep apnea in male and female patients with and without continuous positive airway pressure treatment: a registry study with 10 years of follow-up
Published in
Nature and science of sleep, April 2015
DOI 10.2147/nss.s75166
Pubmed ID
Authors

Poul Jennum, Philip Tønnesen, Rikke Ibsen, Jakob Kjellberg

Abstract

More information is needed about the effect on mortality of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), especially in women. We employed a historical cohort study design, using data from 25,389 patients with a diagnosis of OSA selected from the Danish National Patient Registry for the period 1999-2009. We used Cox proportional hazard function to evaluate the all-cause mortality from OSA in middle-aged and elderly males and females who were treated, or not, with CPAP. Female OSA patients had a lower mortality than males, irrespective of whether they received CPAP treatment. CPAP treatment improved survival, as illustrated by the hazard ratio of 0.62 (P<0.001). This effect was dependent on gender: CPAP had no significant effect on 20- to 39-year-old males and females, but the overall mortality in this age group was small. Survival was increased by CPAP in 40- to 59-year-old and ≥60-year-old males, but no such effect was observed in females. Positive predictors of survival were young age, female gender, higher educational level, and low 3-year prior comorbidity as estimated by the Charlson Comorbidity Index. Negative predictors for survival were male gender, age ≥60 years, no CPAP treatment, prior comorbidity, and low educational level. CPAP therapy is associated with reduced all-cause mortality in middle-aged and elderly males, but no significant effect was found in females.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 2%
Unknown 50 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 12%
Other 6 12%
Researcher 5 10%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Student > Master 4 8%
Other 13 25%
Unknown 12 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 53%
Psychology 3 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Engineering 2 4%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 13 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 June 2018.
All research outputs
#7,219,987
of 13,799,368 outputs
Outputs from Nature and science of sleep
#110
of 202 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#87,260
of 232,979 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature and science of sleep
#3
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,799,368 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 202 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.6. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,979 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.