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Statins use and risk of new-onset diabetes in hypertensive patients: a population-based retrospective cohort study in Yinzhou district, Ningbo city, People’s Republic of China

Overview of attention for article published in Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, May 2018
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  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
31 Mendeley
Title
Statins use and risk of new-onset diabetes in hypertensive patients: a population-based retrospective cohort study in Yinzhou district, Ningbo city, People’s Republic of China
Published in
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, May 2018
DOI 10.2147/tcrm.s158850
Pubmed ID
Authors

hailong li, hongbo lin, Houyu Zhao, Yang Xu, Yinchu Cheng, Peng Shen, Siyan Zhan

Abstract

Reports have suggested that statin use is associated with an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Guidelines suggested that statins should be prescribed in hypertensive patients for primary prevention. However, there were very few studies on the risk of T2DM associated with statin use among patients with hypertension in mainland People's Republic of China. To determine the association between statin use and new-onset diabetes mellitus among patients with hypertension in mainland People's Republic of China. We performed a retrospective cohort study of hypertensive patients using the Yinzhou regional health care database from January 1, 2010, to August 31, 2016. Patients aged 30-90 years old without T2DM were eligible for inclusion. We identified new statin initiators and nonusers by using prescription records of inpatients and outpatients. Multivariate Cox model and propensity score methods were used to adjust potential confounders, including age, sex, body mass index, comorbidities, lifestyle characteristics, and baseline antihypertensive drug use. The risk of incident T2DM among statin initiators compared to nonusers was estimated by the Cox proportional hazards model. Propensity scores for statin use were then developed using logistic regression, statin initiators were matched 1:1 with nonusers according to propensity scores with the nearest neighbor matching method within 0.2 caliper width, and Cox regression was again conducted. Among 67,993 patients (21,551 statin initiators; 46,442 nonusers), the unadjusted incidence rate of incident T2DM was higher in statin initiators than nonusers (25.68 versus 14.19 events/1,000 person-years; adjusted hazard ratio: 1.55; 95% confidence interval: 1.44-1.66). After propensity score 1:1 matching (19,818 statin initiators; 19,818 nonusers), baseline characteristics between 2 groups were balanced except that the nonusers group was 0.53 years older on average (P<0.001). Then statin use was still associated with a significant increased risk for T2DM in the matched cohort (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.54; 95% confidence interval: 1.41-1.67). Subgroup analyses also demonstrated similar findings. Our study indicated an association between statin use and an increased risk of new-onset diabetes mellitus. It provides better understanding of statin and new-onset diabetes mellitus association among hypertensive patients in real-word setting. As an observational study, our findings were prone to unmeasured confounding and bias.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 23%
Researcher 5 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Student > Master 2 6%
Professor 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 10 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Computer Science 2 6%
Sports and Recreations 2 6%
Other 5 16%
Unknown 12 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2018.
All research outputs
#7,267,239
of 12,886,920 outputs
Outputs from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#447
of 950 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,670
of 269,060 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#9
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,886,920 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 950 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,060 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.