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Adult children of parents with young-onset dementia narrate the experiences of their youth through metaphors

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, May 2015
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4 tweeters

Citations

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47 Mendeley
Title
Adult children of parents with young-onset dementia narrate the experiences of their youth through metaphors
Published in
Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, May 2015
DOI 10.2147/jmdh.s84069
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aud Johannessen, Kirsten Thorsen, Knut Engedal

Abstract

Limited research exists on the development and needs of children of parents with young-onset dementia (YOD) (<65 years old). There is scarce knowledge of how these children experience the situation of growing up with a parent with dementia. This study investigates the stories of children of persons with YOD and interprets their metaphorical expressions of their experiences as a source of understanding their situation and needs during the development and course of their parent's dementia. Qualitative interviews with 14 informants (aged 18-30 years; nine daughters, five sons) were conducted in 2014 and subsequently analyzed by the informants' use of metaphors. Steger's three-step method for analyzing metaphors was applied. The analysis identified four themes in the metaphors: the informants' relations to the disease, to the self, to the parent, and to others. From these themes, four core metaphors were abstracted: "my parent is sliding away"; "emotional chaos"; "becoming a parent to my parent"; and "a battle". The study revealed that growing up with a parent with dementia has a great impact on the children's situation and their experiences of their personal development. Children of a parent with YOD are a group with unmet needs for support. A formalized system where the children can get into contact with service providers to receive tailored information and individual follow-up needs to be established. The service providers must listen to the children's stories, perceive how metaphors convey their experiences, and recognize their need for support for their own development.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 21%
Student > Master 7 15%
Student > Postgraduate 4 9%
Researcher 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 11 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 16 34%
Social Sciences 11 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 11 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 October 2017.
All research outputs
#13,030,173
of 21,321,610 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare
#367
of 716 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#121,929
of 249,756 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,321,610 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 716 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 249,756 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them