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Strategies for the management and prevention of conformation-related respiratory disorders in brachycephalic dogs

Overview of attention for article published in Veterinary Medicine : Research and Reports, January 2015
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1 tweeter
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1 Google+ user

Citations

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Readers on

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62 Mendeley
Title
Strategies for the management and prevention of conformation-related respiratory disorders in brachycephalic dogs
Published in
Veterinary Medicine : Research and Reports, January 2015
DOI 10.2147/vmrr.s60475
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rowena MA Packer, Michael Tivers

Abstract

Brachycephalic (short-muzzled) dogs are increasingly popular pets worldwide, with marked increases in registrations of breeds such as the Pug and French Bulldog over the past decade in the UK. Despite their popularity, many brachycephalic breeds are affected by an early-onset, lifelong respiratory disorder, brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome (BOAS). This disorder arises due to a mismatch in the proportions of the skull and the soft tissues held within the nose and pharynx, resulting in obstruction of the airway during respiration. Increased airway resistance encourages secondary changes such as eversion of the laryngeal saccules and collapse of the larynx. Clinical signs of BOAS are often early onset and chronic, including dyspnea, exercise intolerance, heat intolerance, and abnormal and increased respiratory noise. Episodes of severe dyspnea can also occur, leading to cyanosis, syncope, and death. BOAS may have a severe impact upon the welfare of affected dogs, compromising their ability to exercise, play, eat, and sleep. Although a well-described condition, with surgical treatments for the palliation of this disorder published since the 1920s, many dogs still experience airway restrictions postsurgically and a compromised quality of life. In addition, the prevalence of this disorder does not appear to have substantially reduced in this time, and may have increased. Ultimately, strategies to improve the breeding of these dogs to prevent BOAS are required to improve brachycephalic health and welfare. Recent studies have revealed conformational risk factors associated with BOAS, such as short muzzles and thick necks, which should be discouraged to avoid perpetuating this serious disorder. Positive changes to brachycephalic health may be impeded by a perception of BOAS being "normal for the breed". This perception must be avoided by owners, breeders, and vets alike to prevent undertreatment of individuals and the perpetuation of this serious disorder to future generations of dogs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 61 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 24%
Student > Bachelor 15 24%
Other 8 13%
Student > Postgraduate 8 13%
Researcher 6 10%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 5 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 34 55%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 11%
Environmental Science 2 3%
Physics and Astronomy 1 2%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 5 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 June 2015.
All research outputs
#7,327,980
of 12,204,749 outputs
Outputs from Veterinary Medicine : Research and Reports
#21
of 44 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#117,108
of 233,030 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Veterinary Medicine : Research and Reports
#6
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,204,749 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 44 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.2. This one scored the same or higher as 23 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,030 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.