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Anticancer activity of Nigella sativa (black seed) and its relationship with the thermal processing and quinone composition of the seed

Overview of attention for article published in Drug Design, Development and Therapy, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
66 Mendeley
Title
Anticancer activity of Nigella sativa (black seed) and its relationship with the thermal processing and quinone composition of the seed
Published in
Drug Design, Development and Therapy, June 2015
DOI 10.2147/dddt.s82938
Pubmed ID
Authors

Arik Dahan, Riad Agbaria, Adi Gabarin, Shimon Ben-Shabat

Abstract

The traditional preparation process of Nigella sativa (NS) oil starts with roasting of the seeds, an allegedly unnecessary step that was never skipped. The aims of this study were to investigate the role and boundaries of thermal processing of NS seeds in the preparation of therapeutic extracts and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. NS extracts obtained by various seed thermal processing methods were investigated in vitro for their antiproliferative activity in mouse colon carcinoma (MC38) cells and for their thymoquinone content. The effect of the different methods of thermal processing on the ability of the obtained NS oil to inhibit the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway was then investigated in Hodgkin's lymphoma (L428) cells. The different thermal processing protocols yielded three distinct patterns: heating the NS seeds to 50°C, 100°C, or 150°C produced oil with a strong ability to inhibit tumor cell growth; no heating or heating to 25°C had a mild antiproliferative effect; and heating to 200°C or 250°C had no effect. Similar patterns were obtained for the thymoquinone content of the corresponding oils, which showed an excellent correlation with the antiproliferative data. It is proposed that there is an oxidative transition mechanism between quinones after controlled thermal processing of the seeds. While NS oil from heated seeds delayed the expression of NF-κB transcription, non-heated seeds resulted in only 50% inhibition. The data indicate that controlled thermal processing of NS seeds (at 50°C-150°C) produces significantly higher anticancer activity associated with a higher thymoquinone oil content, and inhibits the NF-κB signaling pathway.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 2%
Unknown 65 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 14%
Lecturer 9 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 12%
Student > Master 7 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 9%
Other 16 24%
Unknown 11 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 14 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 9%
Chemistry 5 8%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 16 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 October 2020.
All research outputs
#9,203,355
of 16,629,244 outputs
Outputs from Drug Design, Development and Therapy
#449
of 1,648 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#98,442
of 235,123 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Drug Design, Development and Therapy
#31
of 139 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,629,244 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,648 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,123 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 139 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.