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Relationship between cobalamin deficiency and delirium in elderly patients undergoing cardiac surgery

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2015
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Title
Relationship between cobalamin deficiency and delirium in elderly patients undergoing cardiac surgery
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s87888
Pubmed ID
Authors

Utkan Sevuk, Erkan Baysal, Nurettin Ay, Yakup Altas, Rojhat Altindag, Baris Yaylak, Vahhac Alp, Ertan Demirtas

Abstract

Delirium is common after cardiac surgery and is independently associated with increased morbidity, mortality, prolonged hospital stays, and higher costs. Cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency is a common cause of neuropsychiatric symptoms and affects up to 40% of elderly people. The relationship between cobalamin deficiency and the occurrence of delirium after cardiac surgery has not been examined in previous studies. We examined the relationship between cobalamin deficiency and delirium in elderly patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. A total of 100 patients with cobalamin deficiency undergoing CABG were enrolled in this retrospective study. Control group comprised 100 patients without cobalamin deficiency undergoing CABG. Patients aged 65 years or over were included. Diagnosis of delirium was made using Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist. Delirium severity was measured using the Delirium Rating Scale-revised-98. Patients with cobalamin deficiency had a significantly higher incidence of delirium (42% vs 26%; P=0.017) and higher delirium severity scores (16.5±2.9 vs 15.03±2.48; P=0.034) than patients without cobalamin deficiency. Cobalamin levels were significantly lower in patients with delirium than patients without delirium (P=0.004). Delirium severity score showed a moderate correlation with cobalamin levels (ρ=-0.27; P=0.024). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that cobalamin deficiency was independently associated with postoperative delirium (OR 1.93, 95% CI 1.03-3.6, P=0.038). The results of our study suggest that cobalamin deficiency may be associated with increased risk of delirium in patients undergoing CABG. In addition, we found that preoperative cobalamin levels were associated with the severity of delirium. This report highlights the importance of investigation for cobalamin deficiency in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, especially in the elderly.

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The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 18%
Other 3 8%
Researcher 3 8%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 9 23%
Unknown 13 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 38%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 5%
Unspecified 1 3%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 10 25%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 December 2015.
All research outputs
#16,047,334
of 25,374,647 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,583
of 3,132 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#146,210
of 276,425 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#52
of 92 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,374,647 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,132 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,425 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 92 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.