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Mental health status, aggression, and poor driving distinguish traffic offenders from non-offenders but health status predicts driving behavior in both groups

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2015
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50 Mendeley
Title
Mental health status, aggression, and poor driving distinguish traffic offenders from non-offenders but health status predicts driving behavior in both groups
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s89916
Pubmed ID
Authors

Serge Brand, Nasrin Abdoli, Ali Delavar, Jalal Shakeri, Edith Holsboer-Trachsler, Fariborz Dortaj, Noorali Farrokhi, Vahid Farnia, Majid Karami, Alirez Esmaeili

Abstract

In Iran, traffic accidents and deaths from traffic accidents are among the highest in the world, and generally, driver behavior rather than technical failures or environmental conditions are responsible for traffic accidents. In a previous study, we showed that among young Iranian male traffic offenders, poor mental health status, along with aggression, predicted poor driving behavior. The aims of the present study were twofold, to determine whether this pattern could be replicated among non-traffic offenders, and to compare the mental health status, aggression, and driving behavior of male traffic offenders and non-offenders. A total of 850 male drivers (mean age =34.25 years, standard deviation =10.44) from Kermanshah (Iran) took part in the study. Of these, 443 were offenders (52.1%) and 407 (47.9%) were non-offenders with lowest driving penalty scores applying for attaining an international driving license. Participants completed a questionnaire booklet covering socio-demographic variables, traits of aggression, health status, and driving behavior. Compared to non-offenders, offenders reported higher aggression, poorer mental health status, and worse driving behavior. Among non-offenders, multiple regression indicated that poor health status, but not aggression, independently predicted poor driving behavior. Compared to non-offenders, offenders reported higher aggression, poorer health status and driving behavior. Further, the predictive power of poorer mental health status, but not aggression, for driving behavior was replicated for male non-offenders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 50 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 12%
Student > Bachelor 6 12%
Lecturer 3 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 10 20%
Unknown 12 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 24%
Psychology 6 12%
Social Sciences 5 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 8%
Unspecified 1 2%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 15 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 September 2015.
All research outputs
#18,422,065
of 22,821,814 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#2,195
of 2,986 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#189,945
of 264,253 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#89
of 92 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,821,814 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,986 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,253 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 92 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.