↓ Skip to main content

Dove Medical Press

The relationship between eosinophilia and slow coronary flow

Overview of attention for article published in Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, August 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
1 X user
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
12 Mendeley
Title
The relationship between eosinophilia and slow coronary flow
Published in
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, August 2015
DOI 10.2147/tcrm.s87761
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yakup Altas, Ertugrul Kurtoglu, Baris Yaylak, Erkan Baysal, Berzal Ucaman, Hasan Murat Ugurlu, Mehmet Zülkif Karahan, Bernas Altintas, Mehmet Sahin Adiyaman, İlyas Kaya, Umut Erdolu, Kaya Ozen, Cayan Cakir, Utkan Sevuk

Abstract

The pathophysiology of slow coronary flow (SCF) involves atherosclerosis, small vessel dysfunction, platelet function disorders, and inflammation. It has been known that eosinophils also play a significant role in inflammation, vasoconstriction, thrombosis, and endothelial dysfunction. We propose to evaluate the relationship between eosinophilia and SCF. All patients who underwent coronary angiography between January 2011 and December 2013 were screened retrospectively. Of 6,832 patients, 102 patients with SCF (66 males, mean age 52.2±11.7 years) and 77 control subjects with normal coronary angiography (50 males, mean age 50.7±8.1 years) were detected. Baseline characteristics, hematological test results, and biochemical test results were obtained from the hospital database. Baseline characteristics of the study groups were comparable between groups. There was no significant difference between groups regarding leukocyte count, paletelet count, and mean platelet volume. However, patients with SCF had a higher eosinophil count than the controls (0.24±0.17×10(3)/μL vs 0.16±0.15×10(3)/μL, P=0.002). In addition, eosinophil count was found to be correlated with thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) frame count in the SCF group (r=0.3, P<0.01). There was no significant correlation between eosinophil count and the number of coronary arteries showing slow flow. Patients with SCF have higher blood eosinophil count, and this may play an important role in the pathogenesis of SCF. Elevated baseline eosinophil count may indicate the presence of SCF.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 X user who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 25%
Student > Bachelor 2 17%
Researcher 2 17%
Other 1 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 42%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 17%
Mathematics 1 8%
Unknown 4 33%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 August 2015.
All research outputs
#16,046,765
of 25,373,627 outputs
Outputs from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#752
of 1,323 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#146,208
of 276,419 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#29
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,373,627 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,323 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.6. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,419 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.