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The association between sleep patterns and overweight/obesity in Chinese children: a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
20 Mendeley
Title
The association between sleep patterns and overweight/obesity in Chinese children: a cross-sectional study
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s90838
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bin Zhang, Yanli Hao, Jiangyan Zhou, Fujun Jia, Xueli Li, Yi Tang, Huirong Zheng

Abstract

This study evaluated the association between sleep patterns and the risk of being overweight/obese in Chinese children. A total of 3,086 children (1,608 boys and 1,478 girls) between 7 and 14 years of age and studying in primary schools were recruited as eligible study participants in this study. We collected the information about children regarding sleep patterns, body height and weight, insomnia, healthy status, time allocation of daily activities, and demographic characteristics using a parental-reported questionnaire. Overweight/obese children were younger, predominantly male, and more prone to have suffered from illness in the past 12 months compared to normal-weight peers. They were also less prone to compensate for sleep deficits during weekends (47.6% vs 39.1%; χ (2)=11.637, P<0.001) and holidays (52.0% vs 42.0%; χ (2)=16.057, P<0.001). Sleep duration on weekdays did not affect the risk of being overweight/obese. The adjusted odds ratios for overweight/obesity (noncompensated) group using the compensated group as a reference were 1.197 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.004-1.493) during weekends and 1.309 (95% CI: 1.052-1.630) during holidays. Compensation for sleep deficits on non-weekdays may ameliorate the risk of being overweight/obese in Chinese children. Moreover, no significant association between the risk of being overweight/obese and sleep duration on weekdays was demonstrated in the current study, which may be due to pervasive sleep insufficiency on weekdays in Chinese children.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 25%
Student > Master 4 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 15%
Other 2 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Other 4 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 40%
Unspecified 5 25%
Psychology 2 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 10%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 5%
Other 2 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 July 2019.
All research outputs
#7,863,383
of 13,617,860 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,151
of 2,350 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106,374
of 237,227 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#80
of 113 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,617,860 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,350 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,227 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 113 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.