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The patient–body relationship and the "lived experience" of a facial burn injury: a phenomenological inquiry of early psychosocial adjustment

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, August 2015
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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28 Dimensions

Readers on

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106 Mendeley
Title
The patient–body relationship and the "lived experience" of a facial burn injury: a phenomenological inquiry of early psychosocial adjustment
Published in
Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, August 2015
DOI 10.2147/jmdh.s89375
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rachel Kornhaber, Jeffrey Streimer, Vanessa Rogers, Julia Kwiet, Loyola McLean, John Vandervord, Marie- Therese Proctor

Abstract

Throughout development and into adulthood, a person's face is the central focus for interpersonal communication, providing an important insight into one's identity, age, sociocultural background, and emotional state. The face facilitates important social, including nonverbal, communication. Therefore, sustaining a severe burn, and in particular a facial burn, is a devastating and traumatizing injury. Burn survivors may encounter unique psychosocial problems and experience higher rates of psychosocial maladjustment, although there may be a number of potentially mediating factors. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the early recovery experience of patients with a facial burn. In particular, this study focused on how the injury impacted on the participants' relationship with their own body and the challenges of early psychosocial adjustment within the first 4 months of sustaining the injury. In 2011, six adult participants encompassing two females and four males ranging from 29 to 55 years of age with superficial to deep dermal facial burns (with background burns of 0.8%-55% total body surface area) were recruited from a severe burn injury unit in Australia for participation in a Burns Modified Adult Attachment Interview. Narrative data were analyzed thematically and informed by Colaizzi's method of data analysis. Three overarching themes emerged: relationship to self/other, coping, and meaning-making. Themes identified related to how the experience affected the participants' sense of relationship with their own bodies and with others, as well as other challenges of early psychosocial adjustment. All participants indicated that they had experienced some early changes in their relationship with their body following their burn injury. These findings highlight the struggle burn survivors experienced with postburn adjustment, but expressed altruism and optimism around their recovery. Past trauma was observed to be a significant finding in this sample. Understanding the "lived experience" supports the way clinical and family systems can foster positive adjustment and coping. Consequently, multidisciplinary burn teams and health care professionals need to understand the principles of trauma-informed care and translate these into practice in the treatment of this group of patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 106 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 106 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 18%
Student > Bachelor 18 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 8%
Researcher 7 7%
Other 12 11%
Unknown 30 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 16%
Psychology 14 13%
Arts and Humanities 4 4%
Social Sciences 4 4%
Other 9 8%
Unknown 33 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 August 2016.
All research outputs
#14,235,639
of 22,824,164 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare
#428
of 818 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#136,021
of 264,261 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare
#6
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,824,164 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 818 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,261 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.