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A cross-sectional study on anxiety and stress in pregnant women with chronic HBV infection in the People’s Republic of China

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2015
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66 Mendeley
Title
A cross-sectional study on anxiety and stress in pregnant women with chronic HBV infection in the People’s Republic of China
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s88602
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fen Zhou, Jianju Li, Keke Lin, Ping Ji, Yumei Sun

Abstract

To investigate the anxiety and pregnancy-associated stress of pregnant women with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in the People's Republic of China and analyze the relationship between anxiety and pregnancy-associated stress in the hope of finding ways to reduce the stress or improve the coping skills for these mothers-to-be during pregnancy. A cross-sectional study was conducted. One hundred and sixty chronic HBV-infected pregnant women (HBV group) and 160 healthy pregnant women (control group) selected from three Peking University-affiliated hospitals participated in the study, and completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Pregnancy Stress Rating Scale (PSRS) survey. The mean scores of STAI and PSRS for the HBV group were higher than for the control group. Factor 2 of PSRS (stress caused by worrying about mother and child's health and safety) was the highest, and was significantly higher in the HBV group than in the control group. Correlation analysis showed STAI scores were significantly correlated with economic status and diagnosis, as well as the total score, factor 1 (stress about identifying with the role of mother), and factor 2 of PSRS, but not significantly correlated with factor 3 of PSRS (stress caused by the changes of body shape and physical activity). Pregnant women with chronic HBV infection experienced higher levels of anxiety and stress than healthy pregnant women. Their major stress came from concerns for the health and safety of the mother and the child.

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The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 66 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 17%
Student > Bachelor 7 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Lecturer 4 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 10 15%
Unknown 25 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 9 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 12%
Sports and Recreations 6 9%
Social Sciences 5 8%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 25 38%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 August 2015.
All research outputs
#17,286,645
of 25,374,917 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,901
of 3,132 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#165,173
of 276,431 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#80
of 92 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,374,917 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,132 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,431 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 92 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.