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Mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric morbidity: current evidence and therapeutic prospects

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
65 Mendeley
Title
Mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric morbidity: current evidence and therapeutic prospects
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, September 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s70346
Pubmed ID
Authors

Galila Agam, Lilach Toker

Abstract

Cumulating evidence for the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric disorders leaves little to no doubt regarding the involvement of this pathology in mood disorders. However, mitochondrial abnormalities are also observed in a wide range of disorders spanning from cancer and diabetes to various neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, Huntington's, autism, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The apparent lack of specificity questions the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric disorders, in general, and in mood disorders, in particular. Is mitochondrial dysfunction a general phenomenon, simplistically rendering brain cells to be more vulnerable to a variety of disease-specific perturbations? Or is it an epiphenomenon induced by various disease-specific factors? Or possibly, the severity and the anatomical region of the dysfunction are the ones responsible for the distinct features of the disorders. Whichever of the aforementioned ones, if any, is correct, "mitochondrial dysfunction" became more of a cliché than a therapeutic target. In this review, we summarize current studies supporting the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in different psychiatric disorders. We address the question of specificity and causality of the different findings and provide an alternative explanation for some of the aforementioned questions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 65 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 26%
Student > Master 9 14%
Student > Bachelor 8 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 11%
Other 4 6%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 13 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 18%
Neuroscience 10 15%
Psychology 9 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 6%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 17 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 August 2016.
All research outputs
#1,597,359
of 14,535,828 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#235
of 2,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,137
of 249,535 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#10
of 92 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,535,828 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,442 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 249,535 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 92 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.