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Study of ambulatory blood pressure in diabetic children: prediction of early renal insult

Overview of attention for article published in Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, October 2015
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
28 Mendeley
Title
Study of ambulatory blood pressure in diabetic children: prediction of early renal insult
Published in
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, October 2015
DOI 10.2147/tcrm.s87751
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nehad Shalaby, Naglaa Shalaby

Abstract

Hypertension is a highly prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Elevated blood pressure (BP) promotes the development and progression of microvascular complications, eg, nephropathy and retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to identify and detect early BP changes in diabetic children and adolescents, aiming for the early prediction of future renal and cardiovascular disease risk during childhood. Ambulatory BP monitoring was undertaken for 40 normotensive type 1 diabetic children with mean age of 11.56±2.82 years, and 24 healthy children as control group with matched age and sex. Albumin/creatinine ratio and glycated hemoglobin were tested. BP indices and standard deviation scores were calculated using reference standards. The data were analyzed by SPSS software version 20 using mean and standard deviations for descriptive data. Correlation and regression analysis tests were used to study relations between BP indices and diabetic parameters. All parameters of BP z-scores were highly significantly increased in diabetic patients compared with controlled group (P<0.0001). The frequency of non-dipping was greater and highly significant in microalbuminuric diabetic patients (P<0.0001). Regression analysis revealed that BP parameters were significantly related to albumin/creatinine ratio, glycated hemoglobin, insulin dose, and body mass index. Our observation revealed a clear link between the nocturnal BP and microalbuminuria which mandates BP follow-up via ambulatory BP monitoring with therapeutic intervention to prevent renal and cardiovascular diabetic complications in adulthood.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 21%
Student > Bachelor 4 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 7%
Other 1 4%
Other 5 18%
Unknown 7 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 46%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 14%
Computer Science 1 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Sports and Recreations 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 7 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 October 2015.
All research outputs
#7,834,176
of 12,485,238 outputs
Outputs from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#642
of 922 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,810
of 250,290 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#51
of 57 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,485,238 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 922 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 250,290 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 57 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.