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Wheezing, a significant clinical phenotype of COPD: experience from the Taiwan Obstructive Lung Disease Study

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, October 2015
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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30 Mendeley
Title
Wheezing, a significant clinical phenotype of COPD: experience from the Taiwan Obstructive Lung Disease Study
Published in
International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, October 2015
DOI 10.2147/copd.s92062
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wan-Chun Huang, Ying-Huang Tsai, Yu-Feng Wei, Ping-Hung Kuo, Chi-Wei Tao, Shih-Lung Cheng, Chao-Hsien Lee, Yao-Kuang Wu, Ning-Hung Chen, Wu-Huei Hsu, Jeng-Yuan Hsu, Chin-Chou Wang, Ming-Shian Lin

Abstract

COPD is an important public health challenge with significant heterogeneity of clinical presentation and disease progression. Clinicians have been trying to find phenotypes that may be linked to distinct prognoses and different therapeutic choices. Not all patients with COPD present with wheezing, a possible clinical phenotype that can help differentiate patient subgroups. The Taiwan Obstructive Lung Disease study was a retrospective, multicenter research study to investigate the treatment patterns of COPD after the implementation of the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease 2011 guidelines. Between November 2012 and August 2013, medical records were retrieved from patients with COPD aged ≥40 years; patients diagnosed with asthma were excluded. Demographic data, lung function, symptom scores, and acute exacerbation were recorded and analyzed, and the differences between patients with and without wheezing were evaluated. Of the 1,096 patients with COPD, 424 (38.7%) had the wheezing phenotype. The wheezing group had significantly higher COPD Assessment Test scores (12.4±7.8 versus 10.5±6.7, P<0.001), higher modified Medical Research Council grade (2.0±1.0 versus 1.7±0.9, P<0.001), and more acute exacerbations within the past year (0.9±1.3 versus 0.4±0.9, P<0.001) than the nonwheezing group. The postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second was lower in wheezing patients (1.2±0.5 L versus 1.5±0.6 L, P<0.001). Even in patients with maintenance treatment fitting the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease 2011 guidelines, the wheezing group still had worse symptom scores and more exacerbations. Wheezing is an important phenotype in patients with COPD. Patients with COPD having the wheezing phenotype are associated with worse symptoms, more exacerbations, and worse lung function.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 29 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 20%
Student > Bachelor 5 17%
Researcher 5 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 37%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 17%
Engineering 2 7%
Computer Science 1 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 6 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 July 2016.
All research outputs
#4,268,118
of 8,069,135 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#587
of 1,013 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#126,344
of 241,671 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#60
of 88 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,069,135 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,013 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,671 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 88 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.