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Predictors of trauma in bank employee robbery victims

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
29 Mendeley
Title
Predictors of trauma in bank employee robbery victims
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, October 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s88836
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicola Mucci, Gabriele Giorgi, Ivo Iavicoli, Giulio Arcangeli, Francisco Javier Fiz Pérez

Abstract

In the literature, there are many studies that have investigated the psychological reactions resulting from traumatic events of varying degrees, such as wars, natural disasters, and acts of violence. Few, however, are the searches performed on employees who are victims of robbery. We carried out a research to assess the psychological reactions of 644 bank employees who had been victims of robbery, especially with regard to the possible development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the variables pre-, peri-, and postrobbery trauma in relation to the development of psychopathological symptoms. The exploration of the reactions after the robbery was carried out on 644 employees of a banking institution, present throughout the national territory, through a survey, consisting of a general description of the event, the Impact of Event Scale Revised-6 scale, and the General Health Questionnaire-12, during the days after the robbery. The analysis showed that the development of pretrauma variables is not significant and that peritrauma variables are partially significant. In particular, being directly involved in the robbery, the thought of being hurt, and the feeling of intense fear are associated with posttraumatic symptoms. Finally, among the posttrauma variables, anxiety and depression played a major role. Surprisingly, a lower level of self-confidence seems to be related negatively to the PTSD symptomatology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 3%
Unknown 28 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 21%
Student > Bachelor 4 14%
Other 3 10%
Researcher 3 10%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Other 6 21%
Unknown 5 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 34%
Psychology 5 17%
Social Sciences 2 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 7 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 December 2019.
All research outputs
#5,264,058
of 16,505,271 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#802
of 2,613 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,548
of 255,496 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#33
of 89 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,505,271 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,613 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,496 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 89 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.