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Optimized balance rehabilitation training strategy for the elderly through an evaluation of balance characteristics in response to dynamic motions

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, October 2015
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Title
Optimized balance rehabilitation training strategy for the elderly through an evaluation of balance characteristics in response to dynamic motions
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, October 2015
DOI 10.2147/cia.s90991
Pubmed ID
Authors

HoHyun Jung, Keyoung Jin Chun, Jaesoo Hong, Dohyung Lim

Abstract

Balance is important in daily activities and essential for maintaining an independent lifestyle in the elderly. Recent studies have shown that balance rehabilitation training can improve the balance ability of the elderly, and diverse balance rehabilitation training equipment has been developed. However, there has been little research into optimized strategies for balance rehabilitation training. To provide an optimized strategy, we analyzed the balance characteristics of participants in response to the rotation of a base plate on multiple axes. Seven male adults with no musculoskeletal or nervous system-related diseases (age: 25.5±1.7 years; height: 173.9±6.4 cm; body mass: 71.3±6.5 kg; body mass index: 23.6±2.4 kg/m(2)) were selected to investigate the balance rehabilitation training using customized rehabilitation equipment. Rotation of the base plate of the equipment was controlled to induce dynamic rotation of participants in the anterior-posterior, right-diagonal, medial-lateral, and left-diagonal directions. We used a three-dimensional motion capture system employing infrared cameras and the Pedar Flexible Insoles System to characterize the major lower-extremity joint angles, center of body mass, and center of pressure. We found statistically significant differences between the changes in joint angles in the lower extremities in response to dynamic rotation of the participants (P<0.05). The maximum was greater with anterior-posterior and medial-lateral dynamic rotation than with that in other directions (P<0.05). However, there were no statistically significant differences in the frequency of center of body mass deviations from the base of support (P>0.05). These results indicate that optimizing rotation control of the base plate of balance rehabilitation training equipment to induce anterior-posterior and medial-lateral dynamic rotation preferentially can lead to effective balance training. Additional tests with varied speeds and ranges of angles of base plate rotation are expected to be useful as well as an analysis of the balance characteristics considering a balance index that reflects the muscle activity and cooperative characteristics.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Researcher 3 8%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 13 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 6 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 16%
Sports and Recreations 4 11%
Engineering 3 8%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 16 42%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 October 2015.
All research outputs
#20,816,184
of 25,576,275 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#1,554
of 1,973 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#210,536
of 287,373 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#49
of 55 outputs
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