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Motivation for everyday social participation in cognitively able individuals with autism spectrum disorder

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
162 Mendeley
Title
Motivation for everyday social participation in cognitively able individuals with autism spectrum disorder
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, October 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s87844
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yu Wei Chen, Anita Bundy, Reinie Cordier, Yi-Ling Chien, Stewart Einfeld

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to examine motivation for the contextual nature of motivations for social participation in cognitively able adolescents and adults with autism spectrum disorder, using self-determination theory as a theoretical framework. Fourteen Australians and 16 Taiwanese (aged 16-45 years) with Asperger's syndrome and high functioning autism were asked to carry a device which prompted them seven times/day for 7 days, to record what they were doing, with whom, perceived difficulty and social reciprocity, and the reasons for engaging in a situation, which were then coded into degree of self-determination. Multilevel analyses showed that participants were more likely to be self-determined while engaging in "solitary/parallel leisure" and "social activities" than in other types of activities. Interactions with "family members" and "casual/intimate friends" were also positively associated with self-determined motivation. Further, participants were more likely to perceive higher levels of being listened to during interaction with casual/intimate friends than in interaction with other people. Global social anxiety served as a moderator for their perceptions of difficulty and social reciprocity during social engagement. The findings highlight the context-dependent motivations for social engagement of cognitively able individuals with autism spectrum disorder.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 162 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 161 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 20%
Student > Master 27 17%
Researcher 23 14%
Student > Bachelor 22 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 18 11%
Other 18 11%
Unknown 22 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 77 48%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 10%
Social Sciences 14 9%
Computer Science 5 3%
Sports and Recreations 4 2%
Other 17 10%
Unknown 28 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 May 2020.
All research outputs
#7,468,281
of 22,830,751 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,027
of 2,986 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,939
of 274,926 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#31
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,830,751 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,986 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,926 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.