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Associations between stress and depression symptom profiles vary according to serotonin transporter polymorphism in rural Australians

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2018
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  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
16 Mendeley
Title
Associations between stress and depression symptom profiles vary according to serotonin transporter polymorphism in rural Australians
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2018
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s168291
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christopher Sharpley, Vicki Bitsika, Mary McMillan, Emmanuel Jesulola, Linda Agnew

Abstract

Depression remains difficult to treat in all cases, and further investigation of the role of genetic and environmental factors may be valuable. This study was designed to investigate the association between the short (s) versus non-short (non-s) 5HTTLPR variants, presence of childhood stressors and recent life stressors, and depression, and to do so at two levels that would expose the associations between total depression scores and also individual depression items. Two hundred and forty-nine volunteers from one of the Australian Electoral Office electorates covering a large rural land area completed a series of questionnaires about childhood and recent life stress and depression, and provided a buccal cell sample for genotyping the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism into s versus non-s carriers. Although there were no significant differences in the depression scores of the s-carriers versus the non-s carriers, each subtype of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism showed different patterns of association between childhood stress and depression symptoms, and between recent life stress and depression symptoms. Individualization of therapy for depression may be achieved through consideration of the specific associations that patients exhibit between life stress, 5-HTTLPR polymorphism, and depression symptomatology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 19%
Student > Bachelor 3 19%
Student > Postgraduate 2 13%
Student > Master 2 13%
Researcher 1 6%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 3 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 5 31%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 13%
Philosophy 1 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Social Sciences 1 6%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 4 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2018.
All research outputs
#11,040,546
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,730
of 2,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#189,740
of 274,267 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#39
of 71 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,537,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,487 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,267 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 71 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.