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Body composition as a frailty marker for the elderly community

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, January 2015
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1 tweeter

Citations

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Readers on

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133 Mendeley
Title
Body composition as a frailty marker for the elderly community
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, January 2015
DOI 10.2147/cia.s84632
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gláucia Falsarella, Livia Pimenta Reno Gasparotto, Caroline Coutinho Barcelos, Maria Clara Moretto, Mauro Alexandre Pascoa, Talita C. B. Rezende Ferreira, Arlete Maria Valente Coimbra, Ibsen Bellini Coimbra

Abstract

Body composition (BC) in the elderly has been associated with diseases and mortality; however, there is a shortage of data on frailty in the elderly. To investigate the association between BC and frailty, and identify BC profiles in nonfrail, prefrail, and frail elderly people. A cross-sectional study comprising 235 elderly (142 females and 93 males) aged ≥65 years, from the city of Amparo, State of São Paulo, Brazil, was undertaken. Sociodemographic and cognitive features, comorbidities, medication, frailty, body mass index (BMI), muscle mass, fat mass, bone mass, and fat percent (%) data were evaluated. Aiming to examine the relationship between BC and frailty, the Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric tests were applied. The statistical significance level was P<0.05. The nonfrail elderly showed greater muscle mass and greater bone mass compared with the prefrail and frail ones. The frail elderly had greater fat % than the nonfrail elderly. There was a positive association between grip strength and muscle mass with bone mass (P<0.001), and a negative association between grip strength and fat % (P<0.001). Gait speed was positively associated with fat mass (P=0.038) and fat % (P=0.002). The physical activity level was negatively associated with fat % (P=0.022). The weight loss criterion was positively related to muscle mass (P<0.001), bone mass (P=0.009), fat mass (P=0.018), and BMI (P=0.003). There was a negative association between fatigue and bone mass (P=0.008). Frailty in the elderly was characterized by a BC profile/phenotype with lower muscle mass and lower bone mass and with a higher fat %. The BMI was not effective in evaluating the relationship between BC and frailty. The importance of evaluating the fat % was verified when considering the tissue distribution in the elderly BC.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 133 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 <1%
Unknown 132 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 12%
Student > Bachelor 16 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 11%
Student > Postgraduate 12 9%
Student > Master 12 9%
Other 23 17%
Unknown 40 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 32 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 13%
Sports and Recreations 13 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 2%
Other 13 10%
Unknown 48 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2015.
All research outputs
#5,405,087
of 6,348,733 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#771
of 839 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#154,741
of 197,137 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#54
of 56 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,348,733 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 839 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 197,137 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 56 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.