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Dosage-related nature of escitalopram treatment-emergent mania/hypomania: a case series

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2018
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Title
Dosage-related nature of escitalopram treatment-emergent mania/hypomania: a case series
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2018
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s168078
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yasunari Yamaguchi, Sohei Kimoto, Takeshi Nagahama, Toshifumi Kishimoto

Abstract

Several studies have documented that treatment with various antidepressant agents can result in mood switching during major depressive episodes. Escitalopram, one of the newer selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), is considered preferable due to its relatively high efficacy and acceptability. Although a few cases of escitalopram treatment-emergent mania have been reported, it remains unknown whether this effect is dose-related. In the present report, we discuss three cases of treatment-emergent mania/hypomania in patients receiving escitalopram for major depressive episodes. No patients had a family or personal history of bipolar disorder. In all three cases, manic or hypomanic symptoms emerged within 1 month right after the dosage of escitalopram was increased to 20 mg/day. Moreover, manic episodes subsided as the dosage of escitalopram was reduced. Mood switching was not observed after the cessation of escitalopram treatment. Our case series indicates that escitalopram may induce treatment-emergent mania/hypomania in a dose-related manner. Treatment at lower doses and with careful upward titration might be favorable in certain patients with bipolar depression and major depressive disorder in order to minimize the risk of mood switching.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 36%
Student > Master 3 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 9%
Professor 1 9%
Unknown 2 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 27%
Neuroscience 2 18%
Psychology 2 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 August 2018.
All research outputs
#12,844,222
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#2,090
of 2,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#236,304
of 275,548 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#51
of 63 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,537,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,487 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,548 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 63 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.