↓ Skip to main content

Dove Medical Press

Article Metrics

Autoimmune atrophic gastritis: current perspectives

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical and Experimental Gastroenterology, February 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
54 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
110 Mendeley
Title
Autoimmune atrophic gastritis: current perspectives
Published in
Clinical and Experimental Gastroenterology, February 2017
DOI 10.2147/ceg.s109123
Pubmed ID
Authors

Artem Minalyan, Jihane N Benhammou, Aida Artashesyan, Michael Lewis, Joseph R Pisegna

Abstract

At present there is no universally accepted classification for gastritis. The first successful classification (The Sydney System) that is still commonly used by medical professionals was first introduced by Misiewicz et al in Sydney in 1990. In fact, it was the first detailed classification after the discovery of Helicobacter pylori by Warren and Marshall in 1982. In 1994, the Updated Sydney System was proposed during the International Workshop on the Histopathology of Gastritis followed by the publication in The American Journal of Surgical Pathology by Dixon et al. Using the new classification, distinction between atrophic and nonatrophic gastritis was revised, and the visual scale grading was incorporated. According to the Updated Sydney System Classification, atrophic gastritis is categorized into multifocal (H. pylori, environmental factors, specific diet) and corpus-predominant (autoimmune). Since metaplasia is a key histological characteristic in patients with atrophic gastritis, it has been recommended to use the word "metaplastic" in both variants of atrophic gastritis: autoimmune metaplastic atrophic gastritis (AMAG) and environmental metaplastic atrophic gastritis. Although there are many overlaps in the course of the disease and distinction between those two entities may be challenging, the aim of this review article was to describe the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, clinical manifestations and treatment in patients with AMAG. However, it is important to mention that H. pylori is the most common etiologic factor for the development of gastritis in the world.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 110 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 109 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 14 13%
Other 14 13%
Student > Postgraduate 12 11%
Researcher 10 9%
Student > Master 9 8%
Other 30 27%
Unknown 21 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 64 58%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 3%
Other 10 9%
Unknown 20 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 September 2018.
All research outputs
#3,926,348
of 13,571,692 outputs
Outputs from Clinical and Experimental Gastroenterology
#59
of 190 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#98,943
of 265,494 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical and Experimental Gastroenterology
#2
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,571,692 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 190 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,494 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.