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The ability of early changes in motivation to predict later antidepressant treatment response

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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37 Mendeley
Title
The ability of early changes in motivation to predict later antidepressant treatment response
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, November 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s92795
Pubmed ID
Authors

Isabelle Gauthier, Philippe COURTET, Guillaume Vaiva, Emmanuelle CORRUBLE, Pierre-Michel LLORCA, Franck Baylé, Philip Gorwood

Abstract

Baseline values and early changes of emotional reactivity, cognitive speed, psychomotor function, motivation, and sensory perception have not been studied to any extent in unipolar depression, although they could help to characterize different dimensions of illness that are harder to capture by clinicians, give new insights on how patients improve, and offer new early clinical markers for later treatment response. About 1,565 adult outpatients with major depressive disorder receiving agomelatine completed the clinician-rated 16-item quick inventory of depressive symptoms, Clinical Global Impression, and Multidimensional Assessment of Thymic States (MAThyS) rating scales at inclusion, Week 2 and Week 6. The MAThyS includes a 20-item self-rated visual analog scale (from inhibition [0] to activation [10], with [5] representing the usual state) leading to five a priori dimensions (emotional reactivity, cognitive speed, psychomotor function, motivation, and sensory perception). All MAThyS dimension scores increased from inclusion to Week 2 and from inclusion to Week 6 (P<0.001). Improvement was around 2 points (out of 10) for motivation, 1.5 points for psychomotor function, and 0.5 points for other dimensions. Motivation showed a trend to being more severely impaired at inclusion in future nonresponders (t=1.25, df=1,563, P=0.10). Its improvement at Week 2 was the most discriminating MAThyS dimension between future responders and nonresponders, and represents the best predictor of future response, with the highest area under the receptor operating characteristic curve (area under curve =0.616, 95% confidence interval [0.588-0.643], P<0.001). Finally, improvements in motivation correlated the most strongly with clinician-rated 16-item quick inventory of depressive symptoms improvement (r=-0.491, df=1,563, P<0.001). Motivation had the most capacity for early improvement, the best predictive value for response, and the largest global margin of progress in depressed outpatients. Assessing the evolution of self-reported motivation over time in major depressive disorder could offer an interesting complementary approach to predict response.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 14%
Student > Master 5 14%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Other 3 8%
Other 9 24%
Unknown 4 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 12 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 27%
Neuroscience 2 5%
Physics and Astronomy 1 3%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 9 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 December 2015.
All research outputs
#7,504,873
of 14,535,828 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#881
of 2,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#104,234
of 284,421 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#40
of 82 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,535,828 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,442 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,421 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 82 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.