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The Danish National Patient Registry: a review of content, data quality, and research potential

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epidemiology, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#25 of 503)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
10 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
678 Mendeley
Title
The Danish National Patient Registry: a review of content, data quality, and research potential
Published in
Clinical Epidemiology, November 2015
DOI 10.2147/clep.s91125
Pubmed ID
Authors

Morten Schmidt, Sigrun Alba Johannesdottir Schmidt, Jakob Lynge Sandegaard, Vera Ehrenstein, Lars Pedersen, Henrik Toft Sørensen

Abstract

The Danish National Patient Registry (DNPR) is one of the world's oldest nationwide hospital registries and is used extensively for research. Many studies have validated algorithms for identifying health events in the DNPR, but the reports are fragmented and no overview exists. To review the content, data quality, and research potential of the DNPR. We examined the setting, history, aims, content, and classification systems of the DNPR. We searched PubMed and the Danish Medical Journal to create a bibliography of validation studies. We included also studies that were referenced in retrieved papers or known to us beforehand. Methodological considerations related to DNPR data were reviewed. During 1977-2012, the DNPR registered 8,085,603 persons, accounting for 7,268,857 inpatient, 5,953,405 outpatient, and 5,097,300 emergency department contacts. The DNPR provides nationwide longitudinal registration of detailed administrative and clinical data. It has recorded information on all patients discharged from Danish nonpsychiatric hospitals since 1977 and on psychiatric inpatients and emergency department and outpatient specialty clinic contacts since 1995. For each patient contact, one primary and optional secondary diagnoses are recorded according to the International Classification of Diseases. The DNPR provides a data source to identify diseases, examinations, certain in-hospital medical treatments, and surgical procedures. Long-term temporal trends in hospitalization and treatment rates can be studied. The positive predictive values of diseases and treatments vary widely (<15%-100%). The DNPR data are linkable at the patient level with data from other Danish administrative registries, clinical registries, randomized controlled trials, population surveys, and epidemiologic field studies - enabling researchers to reconstruct individual life and health trajectories for an entire population. The DNPR is a valuable tool for epidemiological research. However, both its strengths and limitations must be considered when interpreting research results, and continuous validation of its clinical data is essential.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 678 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 7 1%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
France 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Unknown 666 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 202 30%
Student > Master 119 18%
Researcher 117 17%
Student > Bachelor 51 8%
Other 46 7%
Other 74 11%
Unknown 69 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 388 57%
Nursing and Health Professions 20 3%
Social Sciences 18 3%
Computer Science 16 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 2%
Other 93 14%
Unknown 129 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 42. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 August 2019.
All research outputs
#507,578
of 15,335,161 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epidemiology
#25
of 503 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,996
of 364,664 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epidemiology
#1
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,335,161 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 503 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 364,664 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.