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Possible predictive role of electrical risk score on transcatheter aortic valve replacement outcomes in older patients: preliminary data

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
22 Mendeley
Title
Possible predictive role of electrical risk score on transcatheter aortic valve replacement outcomes in older patients: preliminary data
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, September 2018
DOI 10.2147/cia.s170226
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gianfranco Piccirillo, Federica Moscucci, Fabiola Mastropietri, Claudia Di Iorio, Marco Valerio Mariani, Marcella Fabietti, Gaetana Stricchiola, Ilaria Parrotta, Gennaro Sardella, Massimo Mancone, Damiano Magrì

Abstract

To evaluate the predicative power of the electrical risk score (ERS), a noninvasive and inexpensive test obtained by means of a standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG), in a cohort of elderly patients who had undergone transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Survivors and non-survivors after TAVR at 1-year follow-up were compared in respect to the pre-procedural ERS as well as a number of other clinical and instrumental variables. ERS is composed of seven simple ECG markers: heart rate (>75 bpm); QRS duration (>110 ms); left ventricular hypertrophy (Sokolow-Lyon criteria); delayed QRS transition zone (≥ V4); frontal QRS-T angle (>90°); long QTBazett (>450 ms for men and >460 in women) or JTBazett (330 ms for men and >340 ms for women); and long Tpeak to Tend interval (Tp-e) (>89 ms). The trial was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT03145376. A total of 40 patients were evaluated. During the follow-up, the all-cause mortality rate was 25% (ten patients) with 15% of cardiovascular death (six patients). The ERS was the strongest predictor of all-cause (odds ratio 3.73, 95% CI: 1.44-9.66, P<0.05) or cardiovascular (odds ratio 3.95, 95% CI: 1.09-14.27, P<0.05) mortality. Receiver operating characteristic curves showed that ERS had the widest significant sensitivity-specificity area under the curve (AUC) predicting all-cause (AUC: 0.855, P<0.05) or cardiovascular mortality (AUC: 0.908, P<0.05). ERS seems to be a useful noninvasive tool able to stratify the risk of mortality in 1-year follow-up of TAVR patients. These findings, however, require larger trials to be confirmed.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 18%
Other 2 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 9%
Professor 1 5%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 9 41%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 36%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Materials Science 1 5%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 5%
Unknown 11 50%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 September 2020.
All research outputs
#5,611,299
of 17,370,809 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#631
of 1,598 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,491
of 284,980 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#9
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,370,809 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,598 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,980 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.