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Association between frailty and delirium in older adult patients discharged from hospital

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
19 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
75 Mendeley
Title
Association between frailty and delirium in older adult patients discharged from hospital
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, January 2016
DOI 10.2147/cia.s100576
Pubmed ID
Authors

Henk Verloo, Céline Goulet, Diane Morin, Armin von Gunten

Abstract

Delirium and frailty - both potentially reversible geriatric syndromes - are seldom studied together, although they often occur jointly in older patients discharged from hospitals. This study aimed to explore the relationship between delirium and frailty in older adults discharged from hospitals. Of the 221 patients aged >65 years, who were invited to participate, only 114 gave their consent to participate in this study. Delirium was assessed using the confusion assessment method, in which patients were classified dichotomously as delirious or nondelirious according to its algorithm. Frailty was assessed using the Edmonton Frailty Scale, which classifies patients dichotomously as frail or nonfrail. In addition to the sociodemographic characteristics, covariates such as scores from the Mini-Mental State Examination, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale, and Cumulative Illness Rating Scale for Geriatrics and details regarding polymedication were collected. A multidimensional linear regression model was used for analysis. Almost 20% of participants had delirium (n=22), and 76.3% were classified as frail (n=87); 31.5% of the variance in the delirium score was explained by frailty (R (2)=0.315). Age; polymedication; scores of the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM), instrumental activities of daily living, and Cumulative Illness Rating Scale for Geriatrics; and frailty increased the predictability of the variance of delirium by 32% to 64% (R (2)=0.64). Frailty is strongly related to delirium in older patients after discharge from the hospital.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 74 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 23 31%
Researcher 10 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 11%
Other 7 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 9%
Other 13 17%
Unknown 7 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 36 48%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 5%
Psychology 3 4%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 8 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 August 2019.
All research outputs
#1,403,764
of 13,964,301 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#184
of 1,414 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,269
of 337,382 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#7
of 42 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,964,301 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,414 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 337,382 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 42 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.