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Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes (pRBC) induce endothelial cell apoptosis via a heme-mediated signaling pathway

Overview of attention for article published in Drug Design, Development and Therapy, March 2016
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2 tweeters

Citations

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Readers on

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34 Mendeley
Title
Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes (pRBC) induce endothelial cell apoptosis via a heme-mediated signaling pathway
Published in
Drug Design, Development and Therapy, March 2016
DOI 10.2147/dddt.s96863
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mingli Liu, Carmen Dickinson-Copeland, Jonathan Stiles, Salifu Hassana

Abstract

Heme is cytotoxic to the plasmodium parasite, which converts it to an insoluble crystalline form called hemozoin (malaria pigment) in erythrocytes during replication. The increased serum levels of free heme cause tissue damage, activation of microvascular endothelial and glial cells, focal inflammation, activation of apoptotic pathways, and neuronal tissue damage. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain how these causative factors exacerbate fatal malaria. However, none of them fully explain the detailed mechanisms leading to the high morbidity and mortality associated with malaria. We have previously reported that heme-induced brain microvascular endothelial cell (HBVEC) apoptosis is a major contributor to severe malaria pathogenesis. Here, we hypothesized that heme (at clinically relevant levels) induces inflammation and apoptosis in HBVEC, a process that is mediated by independent proinflammatory and proapoptotic signaling pathways. In this study, we determined the key signaling molecules associated with heme-mediated apoptosis in HBVEC in vitro using RT2 profiler polymerase chain reaction array technology and confirmed results using immunostaining techniques. While several expressed genes in HBVEC were altered upon heme stimulation, we determined that the apoptotic effects of heme were mediated through p73 (tumor protein p73). The results provide an opportunity to target heme-mediated apoptosis therapeutically in malaria-infected individuals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 24%
Student > Bachelor 6 18%
Researcher 5 15%
Student > Postgraduate 3 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Other 6 18%
Unknown 3 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 18%
Neuroscience 4 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 6%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 5 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 April 2016.
All research outputs
#5,681,577
of 7,506,617 outputs
Outputs from Drug Design, Development and Therapy
#511
of 966 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#199,781
of 282,938 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Drug Design, Development and Therapy
#43
of 83 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,506,617 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 966 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,938 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 83 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.