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Genistein treatment increases bone mass in obese, hyperglycemic mice

Overview of attention for article published in Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy, March 2016
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Title
Genistein treatment increases bone mass in obese, hyperglycemic mice
Published in
Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy, March 2016
DOI 10.2147/dmso.s97600
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jeffrey Plochocki, Tom Broderick, Layla Al-Nakash, Richard Michelin

Abstract

Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus are associated with elevated risk of limb bone fracture. Incidences of these conditions are on the rise worldwide. Genistein, a phytoestrogen, has been shown by several studies to demonstrate bone-protective properties and may improve bone health in obese type 2 diabetics. In this study, we test the effects of genistein treatment on limb bone and growth plate cartilage histomorphometry in obese, hyperglycemic ob/ob mice. Six-week-old ob/ob mice were divided into control and genistein-treated groups. Genistein-treated mice were fed a diet containing 600 mg genistein/kg for a period of 4 weeks. Cross-sectional geometric and histomorphometric analyses were conducted on tibias. Genistein-treated mice remained obese and hyperglycemic. However, histomorphometric comparisons show that genistein-treated mice have greater tibial midshaft diameters and ratios of cortical bone to total tissue area than the controls. Genistein-treated mice also exhibit decreased growth plate thickness of the proximal tibia. Our results indicate that genistein treatment affects bone of the tibial midshaft in the ob/ob mouse, independent of improvements in the hyperglycemic state and body weight.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 25%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Student > Master 2 13%
Professor 2 13%
Student > Postgraduate 1 6%
Other 5 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 44%
Unspecified 2 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Sports and Recreations 1 6%
Other 3 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 March 2016.
All research outputs
#5,599,311
of 7,401,456 outputs
Outputs from Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy
#144
of 191 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#194,240
of 275,610 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy
#8
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,401,456 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 191 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.3. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,610 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.