↓ Skip to main content

Dove Medical Press

Article Metrics

Neurophysiological basis of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder: informing future drug development

Overview of attention for article published in Nature and science of sleep, April 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
54 Mendeley
Title
Neurophysiological basis of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder: informing future drug development
Published in
Nature and science of sleep, April 2016
DOI 10.2147/nss.s99240
Pubmed ID
Authors

Poul Jennum, Julie AE Christensen, Marielle Zoetmulder, Jennum, Poul, Christensen, Julie Ae, Zoetmulder, Marielle

Abstract

Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia characterized by a history of recurrent nocturnal dream enactment behavior and loss of skeletal muscle atonia and increased phasic muscle activity during REM sleep: REM sleep without atonia. RBD and associated comorbidities have recently been identified as one of the most specific and potentially sensitive risk factors for later development of any of the alpha-synucleinopathies: Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and other atypical parkinsonian syndromes. Several other sleep-related abnormalities have recently been identified in patients with RBD/Parkinson's disease who experience abnormalities in sleep electroencephalographic frequencies, sleep-wake transitions, wake and sleep stability, occurrence and morphology of sleep spindles, and electrooculography measures. These findings suggest a gradual involvement of the brainstem and other structures, which is in line with the gradual involvement known in these disorders. We propose that these findings may help identify biomarkers of individuals at high risk of subsequent conversion to parkinsonism.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 26%
Student > Master 11 20%
Student > Bachelor 8 15%
Researcher 6 11%
Unspecified 4 7%
Other 11 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 14 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 22%
Unspecified 8 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 9%
Engineering 5 9%
Other 10 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 May 2016.
All research outputs
#3,350,788
of 7,729,992 outputs
Outputs from Nature and science of sleep
#64
of 110 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,251
of 269,376 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature and science of sleep
#10
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,729,992 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 55th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 110 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,376 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.