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Hypothyroidism in the elderly: diagnosis and management

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, April 2012
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172 Mendeley
Title
Hypothyroidism in the elderly: diagnosis and management
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, April 2012
DOI 10.2147/cia.s23966
Pubmed ID
Authors

Isabela Benseñor, Paulo Lotufo, Diaz-Olmos, Isabela M Bensenor, Rodrigo D Olmos, Paulo A Lotufo

Abstract

Thyroid disorders are highly prevalent, occurring most frequently in aging women. Thyroid-associated symptoms are very similar to symptoms of the aging process; thus, improved methods for diagnosing overt and subclinical hypothyroidism in elderly people are crucial. Thyrotropin measurement is considered to be the main test for detecting hypothyroidism. Combined evaluations of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free-thyroxine can detect overt hypothyroidism (high TSH with low free-thyroxine levels) and subclinical hypothyroidism (high TSH with normal free-thyroxine levels). It is difficult to confirm the diagnosis of thyroid diseases based only on symptoms, but presence of symptoms could be an indicator of who should be evaluated for thyroid function. The most important reasons to treat overt hypothyroidism are to relieve symptoms and avoid progression to myxedema. Overt hypothyroidism is classically treated using L-thyroxine; elderly patients require a low initial dose that is increased every 4 to 6 weeks until normalization of TSH levels. After stabilization, TSH levels are monitored yearly. There is no doubt about the indication for treatment of overt hypothyroidism, but indications for treatment of subclinical disease are controversial. Although treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism may result in lipid profile improvement, there is no evidence that this improvement is associated with decreased cardiovascular or all-cause mortality in elderly patients. In patients with a high risk of progression from subclinical to overt disease, close monitoring of thyroid function could be the best option.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 172 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 169 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 44 26%
Student > Master 32 19%
Student > Postgraduate 29 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 5%
Other 25 15%
Unknown 16 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 96 56%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 3%
Other 15 9%
Unknown 19 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 April 2012.
All research outputs
#13,127,129
of 16,516,448 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#1,237
of 1,558 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#95,398
of 130,309 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#18
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,516,448 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,558 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.9. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 130,309 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.