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Possibility of enhanced risk of retinal neovascularization in repeated blood donors: blood donation and retinal alteration

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of General Medicine, September 2011
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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11 Mendeley
Title
Possibility of enhanced risk of retinal neovascularization in repeated blood donors: blood donation and retinal alteration
Published in
International Journal of General Medicine, September 2011
DOI 10.2147/ijgm.s23206
Pubmed ID
Authors

Reza Rastmanesh

Abstract

Repeated blood donors manifest clinical, subclinical, and biochemical signs of iron deficiency anemia, have significantly higher erythropoietin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations, and decreased tissue oxygen saturation, oxygenated tissue hemoglobin, and regional cerebral oxygen saturation. Erythropoietin and VEGF are potent retinal angiogenic factors which may initiate and promote the retinal angiogenesis process independently or simultaneously. Increases in circulating levels of erythropoietin and VEGF are proportionate to the levels of hematocrit, hypoxemia, and tissue hypoxia. It is suggested that higher erythropoietin production following iron deficiency anemia-induced chronic hypoxemia/ hypoxia may, hypothetically, enhance the risk of retinal angiogenesis and/or neovascularization, possibly by inducing hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha, which consequently upregulates genes stimulating angiogenesis, resulting in formation of a new vasculature, possibly by modulation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling in the retina. Implications of this hypothesis cover erythropoietin doping, chronic hypoxia, and hypoxemic situations, such as angiogenesis-related cardiac and pulmonary diseases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 18%
Other 1 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 9%
Student > Bachelor 1 9%
Other 2 18%
Unknown 1 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 36%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 9%
Social Sciences 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Unknown 1 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 September 2011.
All research outputs
#20,163,398
of 22,673,450 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of General Medicine
#1,119
of 1,431 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#114,692
of 125,021 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of General Medicine
#7
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,673,450 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,431 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 125,021 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.