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Signs of progress in the Australian post-2000 COPD experience, but some old problems remain

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, June 2012
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4 tweeters

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22 Mendeley
Title
Signs of progress in the Australian post-2000 COPD experience, but some old problems remain
Published in
International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, June 2012
DOI 10.2147/copd.s30003
Pubmed ID
Authors

David Dunt, Doyle

Abstract

This study aims to describe current trends in Australia regarding chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mortality and morbidity rates, and in its treatment and prevention from 2000 to 2010. The study's purpose is to better define future directions in curbing COPD. People with COPD and their caregivers who attend patient support groups (n = 21), pulmonary rehabilitation group coordinators (n = 27) within Victoria, and the Australian Lung Foundation provided informed feedback. COPD was a leading underlying cause of death in both sexes during these years. Nevertheless, mortality rates declined from 1980 to 2007, with rates for males almost halving. Its prevalence has also substantially declined. Smoking rates have declined in age groups over 40 years old in both sexes. The COPD-X Plan provides evidence-based guidelines for the management of COPD. Many government, professional, and community initiatives have been recently implemented to promote the Plan. Two studies--one conducted before and one conducted after the publication of the COPD-X Plan--report some progress, but there are still very considerable departures from evidence-based practice. The Australian Lung Foundation estimates that only 1% of patients who could benefit from pulmonary rehabilitation programs have suitable access to such programs. A common priority for all informants was that there needed to be greater awareness of--and a more positive orientation to--COPD in both the Australian and health professional communities. The study concluded that substantial reductions in COPD and smoking cessation rates contrast with more limited progress toward adopting other aspects of evidence-based practice. The "good news" story concerning reductions in COPD disease with improving smoking cessation rates could form the basis for suitable media campaigns.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 23%
Student > Master 5 23%
Student > Bachelor 4 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 9%
Professor 1 5%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 2 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 14%
Psychology 2 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 9%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 3 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 June 2012.
All research outputs
#7,812,622
of 12,450,995 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#983
of 1,517 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,261
of 120,268 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#24
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,450,995 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,517 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 120,268 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.