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Investigating analgesic and psychological factors associated with risk of postpartum depression development: a case–control study

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, June 2016
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
65 Mendeley
Title
Investigating analgesic and psychological factors associated with risk of postpartum depression development: a case–control study
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, June 2016
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s105918
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ban Leong Sng, Thangavelautham Suhitharan, Thi Phuong Tu Pham, Helen Chen, Pryseley Nkouibert Assam, Rehena Sultana, Ene-Choo Tan, Nian-Lin Reena Han

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the role of peripartum analgesic and psychological factors that may be related to postpartum depression (PPD). This case-control study was conducted in pregnant females who delivered at KK Women's and Children's Hospital from November 2010 to October 2013 and had postpartum psychological assessment. Demographic, medical, and postpartum psychological status assessments, intrapartum data including method of induction of labor, mode of labor analgesia, duration of first and second stages of labor, mode of delivery, and pain intensity on hospital admission and after delivery were collected. PPD was assessed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and clinical assessment by the psychiatrist. There were 62 cases of PPD and 417 controls after childbirth within 4-8 weeks. The odds of PPD was significantly lower (33 of 329 [10.0%]) in females who received epidural analgesia for labor compared with those who chose nonepidural analgesia (29 of 150 [19.3%]) ([odds ratio] 0.47 (0.27-0.8), P=0.0078). The multivariate analysis showed that absence of labor epidural analgesia, increasing age, family history of depression, history of depression, and previous history of PPD were independent risk factors for development of PPD. The absence of labor epidural analgesia remained as an independent risk factor for development of PPD when adjusted for psychiatric predictors of PPD such as history of depression or PPD and family history of depression.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 65 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 18%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Researcher 5 8%
Librarian 5 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 21 32%
Unknown 12 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 23%
Psychology 13 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 14 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 June 2016.
All research outputs
#8,378,749
of 14,533,317 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,146
of 2,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#124,227
of 265,925 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#57
of 99 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,533,317 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,442 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,925 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 99 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.