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The spectrum of medical errors: when patients sue

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of General Medicine, July 2012
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  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
14 Mendeley
Title
The spectrum of medical errors: when patients sue
Published in
International Journal of General Medicine, July 2012
DOI 10.2147/ijgm.s24257
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jane Grant-Kels, Barry Kels

Abstract

Inarguably medical errors constitute a serious, dangerous, and expensive problem for the twenty-first-century US health care system. This review examines the incidence, nature, and complexity of alleged medical negligence and medical malpractice. The authors hope this will constitute a road map to medical providers so that they can better understand the present climate and hopefully avoid the "Scylla and Charybdis" of medical errors and medical malpractice. Despite some documented success in reducing medical errors, adverse events and medical errors continue to represent an indelible stain upon the practice, reputation, and success of the US health care industry. In that regard, what may be required to successfully attack the unacceptably high severity and volume of medical errors is a locally directed and organized initiative sponsored by individual health care organizations that is coordinated, supported, and guided by state and federal governmental and nongovernmental agencies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 7%
Unknown 13 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 29%
Researcher 3 21%
Other 2 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 29%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 14%
Engineering 2 14%
Social Sciences 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 August 2012.
All research outputs
#2,311,483
of 4,507,144 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of General Medicine
#115
of 273 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#35,265
of 75,284 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of General Medicine
#18
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,144 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 273 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 75,284 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.