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Self-perceived cognitive deficits and their relationship with internalized stigma and quality of life in patients with schizophrenia

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
Title
Self-perceived cognitive deficits and their relationship with internalized stigma and quality of life in patients with schizophrenia
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, June 2016
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s108537
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jong-Hoon Kim, Yeon-Jeong Shin, Yo-Han Joo

Abstract

We investigated self-perceived cognitive deficits and their relationship with internalized stigma and quality of life in patients with schizophrenia in order to shed light on the clinical correlates of subjective cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Seventy outpatients with schizophrenia were evaluated. Patients' self-perceived cognitive deficits, internalized stigma, and subjective quality of life were assessed using the Scale to Investigate Cognition in Schizophrenia (SSTICS), the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale (ISMI), and the Schizophrenia Quality of Life Scale Revision 4 (SQLS-R4), respectively. Correlation and regression analyses controlling for the severity of symptoms of schizophrenia were performed, and a mediation analysis was conducted to examine the hypothesis that internalized stigma mediates the relationship between self-perceived cognitive deficits and subjective quality of life. Pearson's partial correlation analysis showed significant correlations among the SSTICS, ISMI, and SQLS-R4 scores (P<0.01). Multiple regression analysis showed that the SSTICS and ISMI scores significantly predicted the SQLS-R4 score (P<0.01). Mediation analysis revealed that the strength of the association between the SSTICS and SQLS-R4 scores decreased from β=0.74 (P<0.01) to β=0.56 (P<0.01), when the ISMI score was statistically controlled. The Sobel test revealed that this difference was significant (P<0.01), indicating that internalized stigma partially mediated the relationship between self-perceived cognitive deficits and quality of life. The present study indicates that self-perceived cognitive deficits are significantly associated with internalized stigma and quality of life. Furthermore, internalized stigma was identified as a partial mediator of the relationship between self-perceived cognitive deficits and quality of life. These findings suggest that clinicians should be aware that patients with schizophrenia experience significantly greater self-stigma when they suffer subjective cognitive deficits, and that this may further compromise their quality of life.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Nigeria 1 2%
Unknown 55 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 19%
Researcher 7 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 11%
Student > Postgraduate 5 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 14 25%
Unknown 10 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 16 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 18%
Social Sciences 4 7%
Neuroscience 3 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 14 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 August 2016.
All research outputs
#7,374,368
of 14,533,317 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#824
of 2,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,936
of 265,172 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#38
of 101 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,533,317 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,442 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,172 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 101 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.